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Newsletter

Newsletter for the Week of November 3-7  

 

Front Page News for the Week of November 3-7, 2014
 

Monday November 3rd is Parent Teacher conference day. Please mark your calendar and make plans to come and discuss your child’s progress and pick up his/her report card. I tried as much as possible to accommodate each parent’s time preference, so please make every effort to be on time.

Next Week in Spelling:

There will be no spelling test next week.

 

Next Week in Reading: Students will-

Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

Language:

Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.

Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Form and use possessives.

http://www2.estrellamountain.edu/faculty/stonebrink/ESL012/possessives/turtlemc3quiz.swf Possessive nouns game

http://www.softschools.com/quizzes/grammar/apostrophe/quiz602.html Possessive nouns quiz

http://www.internet4classrooms.com/grade_level_help/use_text_features_language_arts_third_3rd_grade.htm Text features

http://www.internet4classrooms.com/grade_level_help/use_text_features_language_arts_third_3rd_grade.htm Print styles, captions, and chapter headings.

*An English Language Arts test will be given on Thursday.

 

http://www.quia.com/rr/6516.html Irregular plural nouns game

 

Next Week in Math, Students will:

Use basic multiplication facts and number patterns to multiply by multiples of 10.

Solve for one problem and use the solution to complete a second problem.

Example:

 

3 x 5 =     15

15 ones

     30 x 5 =     150

15 tens

   300 x 5 =   1500

15 hundreds

3000 x 5 = 15,000

15 thousand

 

Sample Questions

 

1.            Fred is going to play miniature golf with his aunt’s family. It costs $20 for each adult and $10 for each child. If there are 5 children and 2 adults, how much will it cost for everyone to play?

2. Julie has 3 rolls of nickels. Sami has 7 rolls of nickels. How many more rolls does Sami have than Julie? Each roll has $2 worth of nickels.

In these rolls of nickels, how much more money does Sami have than Julie?

A.   Sami has 10 more rolls, so she has $20 more than Julie.

B.   Sami has 4 more rolls, so she has $42 more than Julie.

C.   Sami has 4 more rolls, so she has $8 more than Julie.

D.   Sami has 3 more rolls, so she has $6 more than Julie.

 

3. Fred is going to play miniature golf with his aunt’s family. It costs $20 for each adult and $10 for each child. If there are 5 children and 2 adults, how much will it cost for everyone to play?

 

4. Writing to Explain Maya sold 5 toys at a yard sale. She sold each toy for $10. Later, she spent $8 on a net and volleyball at a neighbor’s yard sale. How much money does Maya have now? Explain the steps you used to solve.

 

A math test will be given on Thursday.

 

Next Week in Social Studies: Students will:

Explain the role of Africans in developing the culture and economy of South Carolina, including the growth of the slave trade; slave contributions to the plantation economy; the daily lives of the enslaved people; the development of the Gullah culture; and their resistance to slavery.

English settlers from Barbados brought with them the knowledge of the plantation system which was dependent on slave labor. They also brought their slaves. Captives, chained together below decks for weeks on very crowded and unsanitary ships, were brought from West Africa. At first, enslaved Africans were brought to Barbados and then to Charleston, but as time changed, the slaves were brought directly to Charleston. Slaves were valuable to the wealthy lowcountry planters because they knew how to grow rice which became central to the plantation economy and wealth of South Carolina.

The institution of slavery came to dominate the culture of the lowcountry and eventually the culture of all of South Carolina. African slaves also made significant contributions to the culture of South Carolina. Slaves entered the port of Charleston, but were quarantined on nearby Sullivan’s Island to prevent the introduction of disease as well as to regain their strength in order to be more marketable. The slave trade included slave auctions which were the primary way of selling the enslaved people who arrived on the ships from Africa. Slaves were inspected by potential buyers and sold to the highest bidder. The daily life of the enslaved people differed widely from plantation to plantation or house to house depending on the benevolence of the master. The daily life of slaves included hard work and long hours in the fields that benefited the plantation owner, not the worker. Despite their often brutal circumstances, the enslaved Africans tried to keep the traditions of their homeland and succeeded in many cases. Their ingenuity and desire to communicate with fellow slaves who spoke many different African tongues led to the development of a common language. The blending of African traditions led to the Gullah culture which has its own music, stories and art forms, such as sweetgrass basket weaving. The enslaved Africans also brought foods and techniques of cooking food to South Carolina. Residents enjoy okra, yams, hoppin’ john and other foods and the technique of frying food because of influences from Africa. Though mostly peaceful, enslaved Africans sometimes practiced acts of resistance against white authority. The effort to keep their African traditions alive was a silent statement of resistance. Enslaved people could also sabotage tools, work slowly, or in more drastic situations, run away or rebel. There were a few examples of violence such as the Stono Rebellion. This rebellion was quickly put down, participating slaves were executed and a new set of laws was passed in South Carolina to control slaves.

 

A social studies test will be given on Friday.

 

Next Week in Science: Students will:

 

Illustrate Changes Due to Slow Processes

Weathering: When weathering is occurring, Earth materials, for example rocks are being broken apart. Little or big cracks in the rock are evidence that weathering is taking place.

Erosion: When erosion is occurring, Earth materials, like rock, sand, and soil, are being carried away from their original location. Water and wind are often the causes for erosion.

Deposition: When deposition is occurring, Earth materials that have been eroded are put in a new location. When the wind stops blowing, sand and soil may be put down in piles as large as dunes. Water may deposit its material at the end of a river and form a delta.

Changes Due to Rapid Processes


Landslides: When a landslide is occurring, Earth materials, like rock, sand, and soil, on the side of a slope or cliff drop down to a lower location. Water soaking into the ground often makes this happen.


Volcanic Eruptions: When a volcanic eruption is occurring, Earth material called lava comes out of the volcano flows down the side of the volcanic mountain (or is sent up into the air and lands nearby) where it hardens. The hardened volcanic rock forms new Earth material and often makes the volcanic mountain larger.

 

Floods: When a flood is occurring, a lot of water causes rivers and streams to overflow their banks over the surrounding land around them. Heavy rainfall in the area is usually the cause of a flood.

Earthquakes: The shaking or trembling of the earth.

 

A science test will be given on Friday.

 

Weekly progress report will resume on Friday November 7th

 

November reading log was sent home today. It is due no later than Tuesday November25th. Failure to turn it by the due date will result in a grade of ZERO

 

Students who did not turn in their October reading log will receive a grade of ZERO. If your child is one of them, please bring his/her reading log when you come on Monday.

 

Please allow your child to log on to Odyssey Learning through Puffin Academy to work on language arts and math assignments. Your child has his/her username and password.

 

See you on Monday!

 


Newsletter for the week of October 27th  

Front Page News

For the Week of October 27 - October 30, 2014

 

Third grade will have its annual program on Thursday November 20th by 6:00 pm. Please mark your calendar and make plans to attend.

 

Next Week in Spelling:

Your child should be able to spell the following consonant blend words:


splash, throw, three, square, scream, strike, street, split,

splurge, thrill, strength, squeak, throne, scratch, squeeze

 

Challenge Words:

squid, squander, arthritis, instrument, strategy

 

Next Week in Reading

  • Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
  • Determine author’s purpose
  • Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

Next Week in Language

  • Read and spell singular possessive nouns
  • Write friendly letters.

 

 http://www.internet4classrooms.com/grade_level_help/main_idea_text_language_arts_third_3rd_grade.htm

http://www.williston.k12.sc.us/kees/powerpoints%20KEES%203-5/powerpoints%20KEES%203-5%20index.htm

http://res.ddtwo.org/3_5Elaresources.htm

*An English Language Arts test will be given on Thursday.

 

Next Week in Math

  • Use patterns to multiply numbers within 1 through 10.

For multiplication fact practice, students may go to: www.aaamath.com or http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/math4/e/areamodel3p.cfm

 

A math test will be given on Thursday.

 

Next Week in Social Studies

  • Explain the role of Africans in developing the culture and economy of South Carolina, including the growth of the slave trade; slave contributions to the plantation economy; the daily lives of the enslaved people; the development of the Gullah culture; and their resistance to slavery.

 

 English settlers from Barbados brought with them the knowledge of the plantation system which was dependent on slave labor. They also brought their slaves. Captives, chained together below decks for weeks on very crowded and unsanitary ships, were brought from West Africa. At first, enslaved Africans were brought to Barbados and then to Charleston, but as time changed, the slaves were brought directly to Charleston. Slaves were valuable to the wealthy lowcountry planters because they knew how to grow rice which became central to the plantation economy and wealth of South Carolina. 

The institution of slavery came to dominate the culture of the lowcountry and eventually the culture of all of South Carolina. African slaves also made significant contributions to the culture of South Carolina. Slaves entered the port of Charleston, but were quarantined on nearby Sullivan’s Island to prevent the introduction of disease as well as to regain their strength in order to be more marketable. The slave trade included slave auctions which were the primary way of selling the enslaved people who arrived on the ships from Africa. Slaves were inspected by potential buyers and sold to the highest bidder. The daily life of the enslaved people differed widely from plantation to plantation or house to house depending on the benevolence of the master. The daily life of slaves included hard work and long hours in the fields that benefited the plantation owner, not the worker. Despite their often brutal circumstances, the enslaved Africans tried to keep the traditions of their homeland and succeeded in many cases. Their ingenuity and desire to communicate with fellow slaves who spoke many different African tongues led to the development of a common language. The blending of African traditions led to the Gullah culture which has its own music, stories and art forms, such as sweetgrass basket weaving. The enslaved Africans also brought foods and techniques of cooking food to South Carolina. Residents enjoy okra, yams, hoppin’ john and other foods and the technique of frying food because of influences from Africa. Though mostly peaceful, enslaved Africans sometimes practiced acts of resistance against white authority. The effort to keep their African traditions alive was a silent statement of resistance. Enslaved people could also sabotage tools, work slowly, or in more drastic situations, run away or rebel. There were a few examples of violence such as the Stono Rebellion. This rebellion was quickly put down, participating slaves were executed and a new set of laws was passed in South Carolina to control slaves.

 

 A social studies test will be given on Thursday.

 

Next Week in Science

  • Illustrate changes in Earth’s surface that are due to slow processes (including weathering, erosion, and deposition) and changes that are due to rapid processes (including landslides, volcanic eruptions, floods, and earthquakes).

 

Illustrate Changes Due to Slow Processes


Weathering: When weathering is occurring, Earth materials, for example rocks are being broken apart. Little or big cracks in the rock are evidence that weathering is taking place.

 

Erosion: When erosion is occurring, Earth materials, like rock, sand, and soil, are being carried away from their original location. Water and wind are often the causes for erosion.

 

Deposition: When deposition is occurring, Earth materials that have been eroded are put in a new location. When the wind stops blowing, sand and soil may be put down in piles as large as dunes. Water may deposit its material at the end of a river and form a delta.

 

Changes Due to Rapid Processes

Landslides: When a landslide is occurring, Earth materials, like rock, sand, and soil, on the side of a slope or cliff drop down to a lower location. Water soaking into the ground often makes this happen.

 

Volcanic Eruptions:When a volcanic eruption is occurring, Earth material called lava comes out of the volcano flows down the side of the volcanic mountain (or is sent up into the air and lands nearby) where it hardens. The hardened volcanic rock forms new Earth material and often makes the volcanic mountain larger.

 

Floods: When a flood is occurring, a lot of water causes rivers and streams to overflow their banks over the surrounding land around them. Heavy rainfall in the area is usually the cause of a flood.

 

Earthquakes: The shaking or trembling of the earth.

A science test will be given on Thursday.

 


Progress report will be sent home the week of November 7th. Please mark your calendar and make plans to attend Parent/Teacher conference on November 3rd.

 

 

 

 

 
   

 

 

 

 


The October reading log is due no later than Friday October 31st. Failure to turn it by the due date will result in a grade of ZERO

 

 

 

My web link: http://wes.ocsd5.net/?PageName='Teachers'

 

Click on my name to access this newsletter and other resources.

 

 

 

 

 
   

 

 

 

 

 

 


Because the students have assignments in class that have sounds, I am asking that you send your child to school daily with a head phone. You may wish to get an inexpensive one for school. Thank you so much for your cooperation.

 

 

 

Have a great weekend!

 


Newsletter for the Week of October 20-24, 2014  

iPad Excitement!

We are very excited that the students have their IPads now. This is a great tool in enhancing academic learning. Please make sure that your child comes to school daily with his/her IPad FULLY CHARGED. Also, please caution your child about the appropriate use of the IPad during the school day. Students SHOULD NOT PLAY GAMES OR DURING SCHOOL GO ON INAPPROPRIATE WEBSITES. I will soon begin to give students assignments to complete at home with their IPads.

 

Next Week in Spelling:

Students will spell the following compound words:

sunglasses, football, homework, haircut, popcorn, railroad, snowstorm, earing, scarecrow, blueberry, butterflies, lawnmower, campground, sandbox, toothbrush

Challenge Words:

thumbtack, earthquake, scrapbook, courthouse, whirlpool

 

Students may download Spelling City app for their IPads and set up an account to practice their spelling words online.

 

Next Week in Reading:

Students will:

  • Draw conclusions
  • Ask and answer questions about texts read

 

Language Skills:

Irregular plural nouns

Compound Words

 

*An English language arts test will be given on Thursday.

 

 Web Links

http://www.internet4classrooms.com/grade_level_help/inferences_and_conclusions_language_arts_third_3rd_grade.htm  Drawing Conclusion

 

http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/inferences.cfm  Drawing conclusions online quiz

 

http://www.quia.com/rr/6516.html : Irregular plural nouns game

 

http://enjoyenglish.free.fr/english/college/irregular_plurals/ip1.htm Irregular plural noun game

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easygrammar4kids/plurals Irregular plural nouns games

 

Next Week in Math, students will:

·         Understand that multiplication is repeated addition

·         Use the concept of the commutative property to understand multiplication facts

·         Apply basic multiplication facts to solve problems

·         Use concrete representations of multiplication facts to build conceptual understanding

·         Use arrays, equal grouping, skip counting, and repeated addition to solve multiplication. For example, if the students make 4 groups with 3 in each group, the multiplication sentence would be 4 X 3 = 12. The repeated addition sentence would be 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 = 12.The skip counting would be 3, 6, 9, and 12.

For multiplication fact practice, students may go to: www.aaamath.com or http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/math4/e/areamodel3p.cfm

*A math test will be given on Thursday.

 

Next Week in Social Studies:

Students will: Explain  the  role  of  Africans  in  developing  the  culture  and  economy  of  South  Carolina, including the growth of the slave trade; slave contributions to the plantation economy; the daily lives  of  the  enslaved  people;  the  development  of  the  Gullah  culture;  and  their  resistance  to slavery.

 

English settlers from Barbados brought with them the knowledge of the plantation system which was dependent on slave labor. They also brought their slaves. Captives, chained together below decks for weeks on very crowded and unsanitary ships, were brought from West Africa. At first, enslaved  Africans  were  brought  to  Barbados  and  then  to  Charleston,  but  as  time  changed, the slaves were  brought  directly  to  Charleston. Slaves  were  valuable  to  the  wealthy  lowcountry planters  because  they  knew  how  to  grow  rice  which  became  central  to  the  plantation  economy and wealth of South Carolina. 

 

The  institution  of  slavery  came  to  dominate  the  culture  of  the  lowcountry  and eventually  the culture of all of South Carolina. African slaves also made significant contributions to the culture of South  Carolina. Slaves  entered  the  port  of  Charleston,  but  were  quarantined  on  nearby Sullivan’s Island to prevent the introduction of disease as well as to regain their strength in order to be more marketable. The slave trade included slave auctions which were the primary way of selling  the  enslaved  people  who  arrived  on  the  ships  from Africa. Slaves  were  inspected  by potential  buyers  and  sold  to  the  highest  bidder.  The  daily  life  of  the  enslaved people  differed widely  from  plantation  to  plantation  or  house  to  house  depending  on  the  benevolence  of  the master. The daily life of slaves included hard work and long hours in the fields that benefited the plantation owner, not the worker. Despite their often brutal circumstances, the enslaved Africans tried to keep the traditions of their homeland and succeeded in many cases. Their ingenuity and desire  to  communicate  with  fellow  slaves  who  spoke  many  different  African  tongues  led to the development of a common language. The blending of African traditions led to the Gullah culture which has its own music, stories and art forms, such as sweetgrass basket weaving. The enslaved  Africans  also  brought  foods and  techniques  of  cooking  food  to  South  Carolina. Residents enjoy  okra,  yams,  hoppin’  john  and  other  foods  and  the  technique  of  frying  food because of  influences  from  Africa. Though mostly peaceful, enslaved Africans sometimes practiced acts of resistance against white authority. The  effort  to  keep  their  African  traditions alive  was  a silent  statement  of  resistance. Enslaved people could also sabotage tools, work slowly, or in more drastic situations, run away or rebel. There were a few examples of violence such as the Stono Rebellion. This rebellion was quickly put down, participating slaves were executed and a new set of laws was passed in South Carolina to control slaves. 

 

A social studies test will be given on Thursday.

 

Next Week in Science:

We will Illustrate Earth’s saltwater and freshwater features (including oceans, seas, rivers, lakes, ponds, streams, and glaciers). 

There are many places on Earth where water is found.  Sometimes the water is saltwater and other times it is fresh water.  Most of the water on Earth is saltwater.  Water is mostly in liquid form in these features, but sometimes it can be solid (ice).  Earth’s water features include:

Oceans           

·         Oceans are large bodies of salt water that surrounds a continent.

Seas                

·         Seas are large bodies of salt water that is often connected to an ocean. 

·         A sea may be partly or completely surrounded by land. 

Rivers             

·         Rivers are large, flowing bodies of fresh water that usually empty into a sea or ocean.

Streams          

·         Streams are small, flowing bodies of fresh water that flow into rivers.

 Lakes& ponds            

·         Lakes and ponds are areas where water, usually freshwater, are surrounded by land. 

·         Lakes and ponds differ in size with ponds usually being smaller than lakes.

Glaciers          

·         Glaciers are huge sheets of ice that cover land. 

·         They are found where temperatures are very cold, for example, high in the mountains or near the poles of Earth.

  

Science assessment will be given on Thursday.

 

Please review the papers in your child’s progress folder, sign the top grade sheet, and return the papers and folder on Monday.

 Reading log for the month of October is due no later than Friday October 31st. Failure to turn it in on the due date will result  in a grade of ZERO.